Title
Mapping Paths to Family Justice: a national picture of findings on out of court family dispute resolution
Description
This article sets out the preliminary findings from the completed national survey phase of a three year ESRC-funded empirical study, which aims to build an up-to-date picture of national awareness and patterns of experiences since 1996 of the three major forms of out of court Family Dispute Resolution currently available in England and Wales – Mediation, Solicitor Negotiation, and Collaborative Law. Whilst mediation was the best recognised of these forms of dispute resolution, the article considers why people who had used it were, in general, less satisfied with it than with those who had used the more partisan alternatives of either solicitor negotiation or collaborative law. The article also explores the reasons given for rejecting these different dispute resolution processes and highlights the high percentage of people who settle disputes without seeking legal advice at all. The aims of the further phases of the study are considered in the light of the changing family justice landscape following the Family Justice Review and Government Response.
Language
English
Author
Anne Barlow
Co-author
Rosemary Hunter
Volume number
43
Issue number
March
Is this item peer reviewed?
No
ISSN
0014-7281
Publisher
Jordans Publishing limited
Date of publication
01 March 2013
Is this item hardback or paperback?
Paperback
Number of pages
5
Page reference
306
Place of publication
Bristol
Has non-academic co-authors?
No
Has international co-authors?
No
For non-academic audience?
Yes
Is this item a pre-print or post-print?
Post-print
Title of journal
Family Law
Harvard
Barlow, Anne and Hunter, Rosemary (2013) Mapping Paths to Family Justice: a national picture of findings on out of court family dispute resolution. Family Law. 43 (March), pp. 306 Bristol: Jordans Publishing limited.
Vancouver
Barlow Anne and Hunter Rosemary. Mapping Paths to Family Justice: a national picture of findings on out of court family dispute resolution. Family Law 2013; 43 (March): 306.