A new dialect in a new city:children's and adult's speech in milton keynes

Professor Paul Kerswill | Linguistics | Saturday, September 1, 1990

The project is concerned with the way in which new varieties of a language - accents and dialects - emerge when large numbers of people from different regions settle in a previously relatively unpopulated area. This mass migration has been going on…

The role of adolescents in dialect levelling

Professor Paul Kerswill | Linguistics | Friday, September 1, 1995

The interaction of sociophonetic features and connected speach processes

Professor Paul Kerswill | Linguistics | Monday, August 1, 1988

Aims and methods (as at end of award) : a previous project on cambridge english (esrc c/00/23/2227) showed that certain connected speech processes (csps - for instance phonetic assimilation) function as sociolinguistic variables. Csps may be thought…

A sociophonetic study of connected speech processes in cambridge english

Professor Paul Kerswill | Monday, July 1, 1985

In everyday speech, we do not pronounce words as clearly as we do when we are asked to say them in isolation. In particular, the less prominent or important parts of words are modified: thus consonants, vowels, even whole syllables may be dropped if…

Multicultural london english: the emergence, acquisition and diffusion of a new variety

Professor Paul Kerswill | Linguistics (General) | Monday, October 1, 2007

London has long been considered by linguists as a motor of change in the english language in britain. The investigators’ esrc-funded studies from the early 90s to 2007 show that, while there is widespread ‘levelling’ in the south-east, leading to…

Linguistic innovators: the english of adolescents in london

Professor Paul Kerswill | Linguistics (General) | Friday, October 1, 2004

London is said to be the source of linguistic innovation in britain in pronunciation and grammar. Quantitative sociolinguistic research in the southeast centres outside london, and notes great dialect levelling (homogenisation), with features…

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